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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
to step down. but in an exclusive interview, libyan's colonel gaddafi came out fighting. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. said that he was delusional. >> it was colonel gaddafi's first interview since this crisis started. he agreed to see bbc news and the sunday times. he said that the u.n.sanction resolutions against libyan were illegitima illegitimate. and asked if he would leave the country. [laughter] as if anyone would leave their home land, he said. >> mr. gaddafi, you have been known as the leader, and for years. and plenty of people in this country would say that the biggest obstacle of change for them and libya is you. >> he said that his presence actually instigated change for the people. >> in recent years you have had important western leaders like tony blair coming here. and now there are western leers leaders saying you should go. >> of course it's betrayal, they have no morals, besides if they want me to step down, what do i step down from? i am not a monarch or king. >> but you can step down even if you don't have a formal title. >> it's honor, he said, nothing to
at cnn world headquarters in atlanta. thanks for joining us. one hour from now the disaster in japan, from the devastation and death to the severe economic impact of the quake and tsunami. that's at 7:00 p.m. eastern. in the meantime, "the situation room with wolf blitzer" begins now. >>> a change in command over coalition air strikes in libya is in the works now this hour. the terms and limits of nato's new role. what it means for the mission and for u.s. forces. libyan rebels now have a new hope of pushing back moammar gadhafi's fighters. we'll tell you about a man who sacrificed his life to help the opposition. plus, the dangers and challenges in the disaster zone of japan. brian todd has an account of the search and rescuers. and our crew, what all of them experienced in the quake and tsunami wreckage. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." [ explosion ] >>> first to a key battleground city where rebels are making headway in the battle to seize controlle from moammar gadhafi. here's cnn's arwa damon. >>
. violence rips law the middle east and the arab world. and now the u.s. is handed over control of the no-fly zone to nato but the u.s. military is still deeply involved. so what is going on? a live report moments away. and a muslim teacher asks for three weeks off to go on a pilgrimage and the school says "no way," she did not work there long enough and the department of justice is suing the school. what is up with that? >> states want to tax big corporations to fix their deficit instead of changing policy so now one big company, caterpillar, employs thousands of people, is ready to flee illinois. could this happen in your state? we continue right now with "fox and friends" this morning. >> welcome, everyone. you are watching "fox and friends" today. >> welcome to "fox and friends" on saturday morning. thank you for waking up with us. that is dave briggs and heather is here and i am clayton. >> lots going on today. >>dave: we start with new developments in libya where rebels have retaken the key town of ajdabiya after a fierce battle with muammar qaddafi forces and rick is live inside th
a fun place to live. jenna: never know what you will find, like e.t. jon: thanks for joining us. "america live" starts right now. see you tomorrow. megyn: thanks, guys. this is a fox news alert. we're expecting to learn new details shortly about what's next in the libya conflict. welcome to "america live," everyone. i'm megyn kelly. top leaders of the obama administration are headed to capitol hill, where they will brief congress, this as moammar qaddafi's forces gain ground, forcing a rebel retreat. among those we expect to see, secretary of state, hillary clinton, defense secretary, robert gates, and joint chiefs of staff, mike mullen, set to answer questions about the road ahead and whether or not terror groups are working with the rebels that are now getting our help. when the news happens, we'll bring it to you and we'll watch it closely. we're told that republicans and democrats have been told to spare no questioning when these three arrive. another fox news alert, this time on a near catastrophe in our skies. an investigation is under way into an incident in florida invol
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
? leave her. >> as we said, our nic robertson is staying at the hotel where it happened. he joins us live now from there. who is this woman and where is she now? >> reporter: she is a middle class woman who lives in tripoli. her tribal name means -- or implies that she is from benghazi in the east of the country and apparently that's what got her into so much trouble. she says when she stopped at a government checkpoint, she came to this hotel because she wanted to tell her story. this is the international journalists were but it reveals perhaps exactly what the opposition fear, what they say happens and how their voices are stifled by the government. it was a very, very shocking event when it took place here. [ speaking foreign language ] she came to tell her story to the only people she thought would listen. international journalists in a city hotel. they're all libyans she calls out. why don't you treat us the same? she claims to have been picked up at a government checkpoint, tied, beaten and raped. her name is imam el abady. my honor was violated by them. it is the first time anyone
with the u.s. and its allies. defense secretary gates says the u.s. will hand over control of the mission within the coming days. however, questions remain about america's long-term exit strategy. >>> disaster in japan. workers get another scare as smoke rises, once again, from that crippled nuclear plant and residents are now being warned about contaminated drinking water and food. this as the estimated death toll jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, jumps to more than 18,000 "early" this monday morning, march 21st, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a monday morning, i'm chris wragge. >> i'm erica hill. >> following two very major stories this morning. first of which the situation in japan. all eyes on that nuclear facility in fukushima once again. this as reports as i mention a few moments ago, smoke emanating from that troubled reactor 3 there. and now reports of radiation levels detected radiation levels in both the food and the water in that safety zone around the nuclear plant right now. we're going to continue
the government forces out. meanwhile, u.s. warships are moving closer to libya as we speak. and this morning, calls for a no-fly zone are getting louder. it's something that the u.s. military would likely take the lead in enforcing. defense secretary robert gates mean, though, setting up a no-fly zone would basically mean war since the u.s. would have to strike libya to take out its air defenses. >>> take a look at the map, a ajdabiya and al brega, capable of landing and a big one, ben wedeman is on the phone from benghazi, libya. ben, you had come close to one of the bombs being dropped. in fact, about 40 yards from you. what schais happening from them >> reporter: what we're hearing, from l bral brega, there have b more air raids. and also this ammunition stock which is providing a lot of the ammunition and weaponry for the rebels who yesterday weren't able to push pro-gadhafi forces out of the day after you mentioned that day long gun battle. i just got off the phone with somebody who lives there, he said the forces are gathering in that town. to,he says, start to push back -- push toward
on the constitutionality of mandatory health care but don't want to talk about who pays for the uninsured. that would be us. unless we let them die. what does that cost every year, both financially and in human misery? thanks as always for your comments and continue to the conversation facebook.com/carolcnn. >> thank you, carol. >>> cnn newsroom continues right now with randi kaye in for ali velshi. >> thank you. we're on top of four big stories this hour. allies making inroads in libya. japan reacting to radioactive tap water in tokyo. the first terrorist bombing in jerusalem since 2004. and the passing of a ledged age. that word is sadly overused but no one wore it better than elizabeth taylor. remarking on her death today at 79, taylor's friend elton john said, we have just lost a hollywood giant. more importantly, we have lost an incredible human being. taylor had suffered for years from congestive heart failure and was hospitalized in los angeles for weeks. a former cnn colleague knew elizabeth taylor well and spoke with her many times on the air and off. we're talking about larry king. he joins me no
, but a dog gave birth do 18 puppies. all the pups and their owners will join live us live. >> i love the little noises they make. >> so a lot coming up, but let's start with libya. fresh reports that rebel fighters have retaken a city. this comes as president obama prepares to address the nation on a mission still very much in debate. richard engel reports. >> reporter: throughout desert, behind the rebel's front line, we follow a secret convoy to bring water and fuel to the the people of ajdabiya, a rebel city still partially held by gadhafi forces. we reach ajdabiya's eastern gate. it's controlled by rebels. and marked by a tattered flag. ajdabiya is mostly deserted, an urban war zone. shops are closed or destroyed. there is to power or running water. just fighting between the revolutionaries and gadhafi's men, says this man. through a broken gate, we enter his home. it was badly damaged by gadhafi's troops. this is shrapnel from the tank round that hit his out and went right in this room. and the fighting isn't over. outside, we hear gunfire. gadhafi's troops are just a few blocks
of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' headquarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us from there tonight. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the rebels have the will, they have the numbers, but they don't have the equipment or the discipline to take on gadhafi's forces where they're dug in, as we saw for ourselves firsthand today. the road outside benghazi today is a graveyard of gadhafi's armored vehicles, destroyed by western air strikes. after an hour and a half driving south flanked by desert, we reached the rebels' front line. there are no trenches or
's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bob. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, ann. we have to point out that the levels of radiation in the drinking water in tokyo are much lower than they are in many cities in the world. as you point out, infants might be at some risk. it has to be unsettling for parents. there is another indication of as long as the reactor keeps spewing radiation we'll have more problems. at the reactor there is hopeful news but more problems, an indication that this is not coming to an end. at this water plant that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found radioactive iodine twice as high as the standard for infants. parents were told to give infants only bottled water. again today black smoke from reactor number 3 forced workers to temporarily evacuate the site. with radiation continuing to leak from the plant workers hooked up power lines to all six reactors. it could be weeks before the cooling systems are operational. reactor 1 reached dangerous temperatures today. work at reactor 2 halted after high levels of radiation we
the coast to force an arms embargo. jim maceda is live in tripoli, what can you tell us about the latest air strikes on gadhafi's forces around misrata? >> reporter: hi there, willie, that's right, there are now more and more of these air strikes happening in that part of the country, which is much closer to us, miss rat rata about 100 milt of tripoli, there's an indication in place than it was a couple days a go. we are hearing reports, not directly from misrata, from others in misrata, calling relatives outside and then we're picking up information from that, suggesting that there are now, has been a series of air attacks, assaults, bombings, on to the pro-gadhafi forces, and that includes tanks, it includes snipers. it includes obviously troops, mortar rounds -- mortar -- mortar men, and they are still in the -- in the outskirts of misrata and have been doing that every day, penetrating to the center, fighting, intensively, often nine, ten, yesterday, in fact, 40 killed, and then pulling back. trying to squeeze at the same time as they attack misrata, trying to squeeze the city. they've c
bombs a key rebel position as u.s. officials of the potential danger of a no-fly zone over libya. we will go live to libya for the latest on the conflict. >>> targeting troops. new details emerge in the shooting deaths of two u.s. airmen in germany as officials investigate the suspect's spob ties to terrorism. we take you to frankfurt where the suspect appears in court today. >>> helpless. emotional appearance on capitol hill actor mickey roone yip admits he is a victim of elder abuse. we will hear more from the 90-year-old legend on the issue that affects millions of americans "early" this thursday morning, march 3rd, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> hi, everyone. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. i'm chris wragge. >> i'm erica hill. good to have you with us today. we begin this morning with the latest from libya. this morning, leader moammar gadhafi's air force is bombing rebel forces there in the east once again. cbs news correspondent mandy clark joins us from ajdabiya this morning. mandy, hello. >> reporter: hello. well, we're on the road towards the fron
treatment. >> i spoke to the bbc's correspondent in tokyo and he gave us more about the situation of those workers. >> at this stage, there are very sketchy details about what the effects of the radiation might be. we know that the two of them that have been taken to the hospital -- one have been moved on to a specialist institute. the level of radiation that they were exposed to, we heard it is somewhere between 170 and 180 millisieverts per hour period that roughly equates to an outwardly rate of getting 2/3 of what is the recommended annual dose. a very high exposure level, and one that has caused a great yeadeal of concern and sparked a round of press conferences. they are giving out what information they can. they are fully aware that this will cause a great deal of alarm, the notion that some of the contractors working so hard to try to restore power to get the monitoring and cooling systems back up and running, that some of those workers may have come into serious harm. >> clearly, any reference to radiation obviously causes considerable alarm. we have seen that in tokyo with the wa
. as well as a major hail storm there. we're going to get the latest in a live report. al will give us the forecast in a couple of minutes. >> in the meantime, we'll get our first look inside the nuclear power plant in japan. you can see the dangerous and dark conditions those heroic workers are battling as they try to restore power to the reactors. and overnight, two workers had to be rushed to the hospital after being exposed to radioactive elements. we'll get details in a live report this morning. >> here's the question that i think will be of interest to a lot of parents out there. how far should a school go to protect one student with a severe peanut allergy? parents are in an uproar over the strict new rules put in place in an elementary school in florida. they claim what's being done there to keep one child safe is hurting other kids' education. we're going to hear from both sides in that story. >>> but we begin this morning with severe weather on both coasts. the weather channel's allison is in greensburg, pennsylvania. allison, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, m
[ laughter ] >> and that's just when the lakers win. >> bret: thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that's it for this "special report." fair, balanced, and unafraid. the online show starts right now. >> shepard: breaking news tonight from another country that's teetering towards chaos. great britain's withdrawing part of its embassy team and security in this country deteriorates. it's yemen. and in libya, new attacks hit close to home for muammar qaddafi. >> word of new air strikes around the libyan capital. we'll see what the jets were targeting and how american fighter pilots are trying to save some trapped civilians. plus, why the white house says we are not actually at war here. and congress doesn't need to get involved. in japan, fresh smoke from a nuclear plant forces workers to evacuate again. and as radiation spreads, there is word of contamination in the drinking supplies. >> i'll probably put -- water now. >> shepard: tonight, new worries in the nuclear crisis. plus, remembering elizabeth taylor. she was a hollywood legend who collected oscars and husbands. but t
apparently to try to fix them up and use them themselves. geraldo? >> geraldo: great job. now, with the eastern half of libya. now, to the western half where qaddafi's forces continue their brutal assault on beleaguered city, the besieged city of misrata. even here they are getting picked apart by allied planes and missiles. steve harrigan continues his report. do they have any idea they are getting their butts kicked in the eastern part of the country? >> geraldo, the government here is calling it a strategic withdrawal by the forces. but certainly it is a turning point in the fight which is really the first time the rebels have gone back on the offensive and retaken a city. of course, they had a whole lot of help to do it. it was really a week of allied air strikes targeting the tanks and armored personnel carriers that belonged to qaddafi and the suspects yo supply lines as well. without fuel or ammunition the forces had to retreat in ajdabiya. the test case will be closer to the capital here in misrata. a more complicated battlefield there because the qaddafi forces are al
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)